RSS

Making a 1840s Floral Red Dress, Part Two

I’m a few days late but here is the second part of making this floral lacy dress! Part one shows the process of making the bodice and can be read here. Today i’ll be talking about how I made the sleeves and skirt.

I went back and forth about what type of sleeves to make for this dress. I love huge frilly sleeves but the neckline of this dress has so much detail that big sleeves would take away from it. So instead I settled on small sleeves with a little bit of lace, which ended up being very similar to the ones shown in the painting I used for inspiration!

To create a pattern I measured the arm hole, measured my arm, and used a lot  of guess work when it came to the length and slopes.

I made a mock up from broadcloth and liked how they looked enough to turn them into a paper pattern which was used to cut them from my floral fabric!

DSC_8966

I also cut the pattern from muslin. I pinned the muslin and floral fabric together, then sewed around the top and sides. This created three finished edges and saved me from making bias tape and sewing french seams later on.

DSC_8967

I folded the fabrics inward by a half inch on the lowest edge to create the appearance of a finished edge and pressed them in place. Then I pinned lace in between the two layers.

DSC_8968

Then the lace was into place, this is what the sleeve interior looks like! I usually don’t make sleeves that allow for this method (It can’t be done on puffy sleeves without adding a lot of bulk) which sucks because it’s so easy and looks so nice.

DSC_8969

I did up the only remaining seam and the sleeves were done!

DSC_8970

I sewed them in place with small straight stitches, then went around the outside with a whip stitch to make sure they are secure.

DSC_8972

After the sleeves were done I sewed together my lining and pinned it in place. Aside from attaching the panel of buttons I think this is the only machine sewing on this costume.

DSC_8973

The lining was completely hand sewn in place. Once that was done the bodice was finished! The lining on this isn’t perfect but it’s pretty close, it’s the damn basque waist that always screws me up.

DSC_8975

DSC_8976

DSC_8974

Since the bodice is done it’s time to talk about the skirt! Like my last two 19th century dresses, the skirt is made up of one big rectangle. Because I didn’t have that much fabric this skirt is only one hundred inches wide, which makes it look a little weird over petticoats.

DSC_8962

I marked out the hem line in pen.

DSC_8963

I did a sort of strange hem on this dress, the selvage was rolled over and basted in place, then the new edge of the fabric was rolled over to create a two inch hem. I used a cross stitch for securing this hem, since it’s kind of fun to do and you don’t see any stitches from the exterior of the garment!

DSC_8979

Then I gathered the top of the skirt. They aren’t large enough to be called cartridge pleats, but I used the same method just with quarter inch wide stitches. There are two rows of gathers, each a half inch apart. I left sixteen inches ungathered in the front, which was turned into a four inch wide box pleat.

DSC_8980

I pinned the skirt onto the bodice and sewed it in place with a whip stitch. This took ages and I ran into so many problems, my  thread was so tangly and broke a half dozen times during this process.

DSC_8981

After the skirt was stitched on I sewed it up with a french seam, I left a six inch opening in the back to make this dress easy to get into. The opening closes with five small snaps.

Once the back was all figured out the dress was done! I’m really pleased with this dress. It’s so girly and lacy, just looking at it makes me smile. I’m also proud that I managed to make this dress from start to finish in forty eight hours, without sacrificing the quality of the finished garment.

I think I might do more forty eight hour challenges in the future, hopefully they will all be as satisfying as this one!

I have a whole bunch of photos of this dress laying flat, but no worn images just yet. I’ll post those next week along with a write up on how I made a matching headpiece.

DSC_8984

DSC_8982

DSC_8987

DSC_8986

Thanks for reading!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Making a Structured Chemise a la Reine, Part One

Today i’m starting a new series. This series actually started on October 1st when I began working on this dress, I just haven’t talked about it until today.

I’ve come up with the idea to pair centuries of fashion with months, then focus on that time period all month long. This month is “18th Century October” and if all goes well I’ll try to do “19th Century November”

My goal for this month is to make two dresses. But i’m hoping to make a frock coat too.

Dress number one is a really inaccurate Chemise a la Reine. These are usually loose garments made from very lightweight muslin or cotton, they are built like chemises (made from large rectangles), and tie at the waist and sleeves to create body definition. They usually had a drawstring at the neck and ties up the front or back.

I’ve wanted to make one for a long time. Just because I like the story behind how they came to exist. Unfortunately I didn’t have the materials on hand, or the ability to get them any time soon – finding light enough weight muslin is surprisingly difficult!

So I decided to make a more structured version out of fabrics I had around. Structured versions of the Chemise a la Reine did exist, but certainly not to this extent. I am completely aware this is horribly inaccurate and i’m sorry to anyone who is offended by it! Hopefully I can make a more accurate version in the future.

For this dress i’m using five yards of white polyester shantung and a half yard of blue silk taffeta, which makes the overall cost for this project around $20.

DSC_9221

Today i’ll be talking about making the sleeves and skirt, a little backwards from how I usually do it but for this dress I actually started with the skirt and sleeves!

The skirt is one very large rectangle, it was 58″ by 126″.

DSC_9223

I originally did a half inch rolled hem. I decided on this because I thought this fabric was only 56″ wide which didn’t give me much room for a hem!

DSC_9224

Of course after I spent over two hours hemming it by hand I realized the mistake, my fabric was actually 58 inches wide! A few days later I stitched it up to be two and a half inches shorter.

DSC_9268

On another note, I have NEVER pricked myself so many times when working on a costume, even when hemming I kept jabbing my thumb! The same thing happened when I was sewing the lining in.

Of course this has nothing to do with my hand sewing ability, and everything to do with the fact I was working with white fabric. White fabric loves to get stained. I kept my workspace really clean to avoid any staining, which is why the fabric kept making me prick myself.

That’s just how white fabric works.

DSC_9279

Anyway! Then the skirt was gathered down to be twenty eight inches at the waist, I left one inch on each side free of gathers so I could do the back up with a french seam. Polyester shantung frays a lot so this was pretty much my only option.

DSC_9229

Here it is draped over my dress form. I used a small bumroll, a quilted petticoat (gathered at the top), and a tulle/cotton (a-line) petticoat to achieve this shape. I’m so happy with it, it’s got a lot of volume without being too much.

DSC_9231

DSC_9233

That was pretty much it for the skirt, so it’s time to talk about the sleeves! I made a pattern that looks like this, it’s a slightly altered rectangle that is thirty three inches wide at the largest point.

DSC_9237

The fabric versions looked like this! I drew lines in the center where they had to be gathered down.

DSC_9236

The sleeves were also gathered at the wrist, and later on I’ll gather the tops. Once inch of material was left ungathered because i’ll also be sewing these up with a french seam.

DSC_9238

Once that was done I made the “ties” from blue taffeta. Since this is an inaccurate structured version these aren’t actually ties, they are sewn directly on.

Each one was cut to be one inch wide, then the edges were folded over and ironed down to create a half inch wide band.

DSC_9239

These got sewn on with tiny stitches, silk taffeta puckers like crazy, as you can see below. But when worn these bands look smooth and lovely!

DSC_9240

Then the tops of each sleeve were gathered.

DSC_9242

And then it was time to add the cuffs. These were made from two inch wide strips of shantung. I folded the raw edges towards the center, pressed them in place, then pressed the finished edges together. This created half inch wide strips with two finished edges…the same way double fold bias tape is made!

DSC_9250

These also got sewn on with very tiny stitches!

DSC_9260

The sleeves weren’t done yet, the tops were still pretty ugly and frayed a lot. To fix that I made more bias tape from shantung and sewed that on to hide the raw edge.

DSC_9261

All that was left was to sew up the seam! These were supposed to be french seams but I goofed up and sewed them like regular seams (right sides together) then trimmed the edge before realizing I had done it wrong.

Shantung frays too much for me to rip the stitches out, so I sewed another seam a half inch further in and covered the raw edge with bias tape.

And no one will ever have to know about the mistake….

DSC_9262

Here are the finished sleeves!

DSC_9263

Next week i’ll talk about making the bodice and stitching it all together.

Thanks for reading!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Making a Glittery Gothic Dress, Part Two

This is the second part in my glittery gothic adventures, part one talks about the bodice and can be read here!

Since I didn’t have very many flowers I decided to make this skirt a half circle instead of a three quarter circle (like my previous flower dresses). Looking back on it I regret this because it didn’t create a very nice silhouette, this type of dress really works better with a fuller skirt!

 I cut the pattern from black broadcloth, but since all my flowers were black they didn’t really pop against the fabric, they blended in and looked terrible.

My solution was spray painting the hem silver to get a grey foggy effect. I think it worked really nicely, it looks interesting but keeps with the spooky/black theme, which normal grey fabric wouldn’t.

DSC_9145

 Even though I was happy with the paint job on the skirt I had no clue what direction to take this project in. It sat on my dress form for several days looking like this and I debated about scrapping the idea and giving up.

Part of the problem was the bat wing bodice (which was a huge failure) but just in general I wasn’t sure how to arrange the flowers and decorations in a way that wouldn’t look silly. My attempts with pinning things on to get a feel for how they would look just made things worse since it looked so bad.

DSC_9150

 I still wanted to move forward with this project so I decided to dive in and hope for the best. Just because one or two flowers looked bad doesn’t mean twenty will…or so I hoped!

Step one was hemming it, I used black two inch horsehair braid to add a bit of lift to the skirt. My sewing machine foot left tracks in the paint which was weird since I left it to dry for several days!

DSC_9152

DSC_9154The skirt totally retaliated by getting paint all over my hand and machine. I really wouldn’t recommend the whole spray painting fabric method because the paint seems to stick to everything else rather then the fabric, and it’s tough to get off.

DSC_9151

Then it was time for flowers. Despite my worries I was really excited about this, everything was so sparkly it was hard not to feel giddy!

I arranged this all on a table because I knew if I tried to do this on my rug I would never get all the glitter off.

DSC_9155

Then I started gluing stuff on. It took me a while to get the hang of it, working with flowers that were all the same color was a bigger challenge than I had expected, but in a fun way. I had to pay more attention and plan things out a bit more to get them to look the way I wanted.

DSC_9156

Here is what it looked like with all the flowers added! I’m really happy with it. It isn’t quite what I had imagined but I think it came together really nicely, it’s tacky but not in a really obnoxious way, which is impressive considering the materials I was working with!

DSC_9177

DSC_9180

DSC_9191

Then it was time for tulle. I used a piece that was five yards wide and twice as long as the waist-to-hem measurement of the skirt.

DSC_9192

Once it was cut out I gathered each edge and secured them at the waist of the skirt.

DSC_9193

Here is what it looks like with all the tulle sewn on!

DSC_9194

But the skirt still wasn’t finished. Though I really liked how it was decorated  the silhouette still wasn’t very nice. It looked too small and sad. To try and oomf it up a bit (that’s a technical term) I decided to add gathered pieces of bat material. Doesn’t that sound like a fantastic idea?

This would add more volume on the sides of the skirt without covering any of the decorations . It also helped blend the skirt and bodice together since the bodice has a bat fabric overlay but the skirt does not. Plus I can say it’s super loosely inspired by panniers which go nicely with my stay inspired bodice shape.

To make these I had to steal fabric from my failed Morticia costume, which I made last year around this time. The fabric was actually cut and sewn into the skirt as godets and seam ripping them out was a huge pain!

They were already cut into diamonds, which made triangles when they were folded in half. I didn’t want to make them any smaller so I decided to leave them in this shape and gather the tops down.

DSC_9195

It worked surprisingly well!

DSC_9196

I sewed those onto the waist of the skirt, then sewed the bodice to the skirt.

DSC_9197The skirt got sewn up the back and it was done! On and I paired it with a sash made from iridescent black/silver mesh. I like these photos since they were taken in front of a window and you can see the glitter!

Photo on 10-1-14 at 12.54 PM

Photo on 10-1-14 at 12.54 PM #2

And here are some poor mirror shots that show it full length.

DSC_9201

DSC_9198That’s about it for this costume! I also made a headpiece and necklace but I didn’t take many (any) photos of the process. I will have a video tutorial about them so maybe i’ll post a link whenever I get it uploaded.

And I tried to get photos of the whole ensemble but everything went wrong and after three hours I was left with zero usable photos. Tomorrow i’m going to try again and hopefully get some better shots to show it all together!

Thanks for reading!

 
9 Comments

Posted by on October 9, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Making a 1840s Floral Red Dress, Part One

This project was really spontaneous. Usually i’m a planner and I think about things for days or weeks before starting on them, but this project is an exception. I was feeling overwhelmed by other projects and wanted a break, but I still wanted to be productive. So I decided to make something new, and to try and make it from start to finish in forty eight hours!

I succeeded and in two days I had a fabulous [18]40’s dress.

The dress is a bit odd. Probably because I made it on a whim and spent about five minutes planning it before I got to drafting. The skirt and fabric choices are the type you would see on a day dress, but it’s an evening style bodice, so it’s kind of all over the place. However I still think it’s really lovely and I adore the end result because it’s so girly and delicate!

The original inspiration was this painting, I really loved the neckline and sleeves with the lace trim. I chose to use the floral home decor fabric I got many months ago in April, along with the matching buttons and a few yards of lace I bought on etsy over two years ago.

DSC_6193

I started by pleating a panel of fabric for the collar, then draped everything around that.

DSC_8925

DSC_8926

DSC_8927

When I was happy with that I removed it from the dress form and made a proper paper pattern. I’m really pleased that I managed to draft this without any seams in the front…even though front seams are more historically accurate I like how it looks without them so much more.

DSC_8951

The first piece I tackled was the pleated neckline, because I knew it would be the most difficult part.

DSC_8928

After cutting it out I marked all the pleat lines with a colored pencil.

DSC_8929Then pinned them into place.

DSC_8930

I used my iron on the highest setting and a very potent starch/water mixture to make sure these would stay in place.

DSC_8933When the pleats were finished I cut each panel down to match the “finished collar size” pattern, which will be used to cut out the lining later on.

I sewed across the front edge of the panels to keep the pleats in place when sewing the front seam.

DSC_8934

To make sure they would line up I pinned them very carefully, then used a pen and ruler to mark exactly where the seam needed to be.

DSC_8938

I hand basted across the line I drew.

DSC_8939

And they lined up perfectly, yay!

DSC_8940

I repinned the panels together, then sewed the seam with my machine.  I pressed the seam “open” from the front and back to make everything really flat.

DSC_8943

And they looked pretty damn good! Not completely perfect but pretty close.
DSC_8944

I set aside the collar and moved on to the main part of the bodice, which is made up of three pieces.

DSC_8948

On the back panels I sewed in loops of ribbon, my plan was that the bodice could be laced up, then closed with a false front of buttons and snaps.

DSC_8949

Once all the pieces were sewn together the ribbon became encased in the seams.

DSC_8950

I set my bodice aside and resumed work on the collar. The next step involved tacking the pleats down. I do this by marking out lines every three inches and pinning the pleats in place.

DSC_8954

Then using a matching thread color and tiny whip stitches I secure the pleats together. If done right the stitches should not be visible from the front.

DSC_8956

Once the tacking was finished I hemmed both edges.

DSC_8957

I also hemmed the lower edge and arm holes on the bodice.

DSC_8958

Before attaching my collar I added the lace. This lace was originally a pure, bright, blue toned white that didn’t match at all. I put it in a plastic bag with hot water and two tea bags for ten minutes until it was the ivory tone I wanted.

I draped and pinned it to the neckline until I liked how it looked, then trimmed it and repeated the process on the other side.

DSC_8959

Here is how it looks cleaned up, just before it was sewn down.

DSC_8961

 After the lace was sewn down I attached the pleated neckline.

DSC_8964

DSC_8965

Lastly I attached buttons and snaps to two strips of floral material. These serve as the closures on the bodice and were stitched on to the center back.

DSC_8953

On the finished bodice they look like this!

DSC_8978

Next week I’ll talk about adding the lining, making sleeves, and the skirt.

Thanks for reading!

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Making a Glittery Gothic Dress, Part One

A few months ago I shared some pretty controversial news about my hatred towards Summer. Surprisingly I received a lot of positive feedback from likeminded people, which is why i’m feeling brave enough to make another statement. This time about a beloved holiday: Halloween

I don’t like it. At all.

Honestly my favorite thing about October 31st is that the craze l ends and I can stop hearing about it and seeing posts related to it. That probably sounds really bad. Like i’m some sort of halloween grinch. Sorry.

I enjoyed it when I was much younger, but I grew out of it before I was in my teens. I used to think it was pretty silly and didn’t understand why it was even considered a holiday, and I still feel that way. But it seems I’m the only one since every year people are bursting with Halloween spirit as soon as October comes along.

I know I should like it, someone passionate about costumes should appreciate a “holiday” centered around them.  However I love costumes so much that I wear them whenever I feel like it, I don’t confine my costume ideas and wear time into a single day.

All that being said – you guys know I have a huge weakness when it comes to seasonal decor. Even though I dislike halloween, and orange is my least favorite color, and gore makes me want to puke, I found myself in the Halloween section of Michaels on a fateful Monday night.

And I left with $70 of halloween, and weirdly, christmas decorations with a project in mind.

Paired with a trip to Joanns and the weirdly tempting pile of crappy polyester that is the Spirit halloween collection and the project was confirmed. I already showed my haul for this project in my progress report last month, so go browse that if you want to see the raw materials before I tore them apart for this project!

My original idea looked like this. I wanted it to be similar to my other flower dresses but with an edgy twist.

DSC_8890

 I wanted the bodice to be shaped like bat wings, which was a neat idea in theory but didn’t end up looking that great. Since I have a pretty small chest there wasn’t enough room to get the shapes the way I wanted.

But I figured it would be okay and moved forward with the idea.

DSC_9033

I actually added all the boning and hemmed the edges before realizing it just wasn’t working. It looked like something you could buy from a Halloween store and the shapes were more spidery than batty.

DSC_9146

So I trashed that. As in literally threw it in the trash and started over. Instead I took it in a different, simpler direction. I decided to make a vaguely 18th century stays reminiscent bodice that would give a conical shape and tie at the shoulders and up back.

The pattern looked like this.

DSC_9163

I managed to reuse all the boning from my failed bodice, so that was good. The boning channels were made from one inch wide strips of cotton broadcloth that had the edges folded over.

DSC_9165

I cut my bodice base from the same broadcloth, then marked the boning channels and “hem line” where the edge will be folded over.

DSC_9166

All the boning channels were sewn in place and boning was added.

DSC_9167

I was happy with it but it looked really cheap, which isn’t surprising since broadcloth is less than $3 a yard. To fancy it up a bit I took some black mesh and stitched it on as an overlay. This was purchased from the spirit fabric line at Joanns a few years ago, it has spiderwebs and bats stitched into the mesh, it’s really cute!

DSC_9168

After that was sewn in place I rolled all the edges over and sewed them down.

DSC_9181

Warning: if you have a fear of glitter I would suggest skipping this part

Then it was time for the fun part, embellishing! I saved some glittery bats, leaves, and spiders for this along with the orange and silver christmas decorations. Unlike my previous flower dresses, there aren’t any flowers in the bodice.

DSC_9170

I was really torn about how this looked, but it’s grown on me over time! I think it’s really strange and pretty.

DSC_9182

I removed any glue strings and added the tulle overlay. I was surprised to find that it looked very sheer. I was hoping it would subdue the decorations a bit and make everything a bit less intense, but that didn’t happen!

The tulle does still have a purpose though, it keeps glitter from escaping.

DSC_9183

The edges of the tulle were rolled over and stitched down. Then I added silver grommets to the shoulders.

These days I usually hand embroider eyelets but I thought the contrast of the silver grommets would look better in this particular garment.

DSC_9184

I cut strips of my batty mesh material and used those as ties at the shoulder.

To finish off the garment I sewed black bias tape around the interior to cover any ugly edges.

DSC_9185

Then I added grommets to the back and it was done! It didn’t turn out the way I had planned but I think it’s cute, sparkly, and tacky without looking cheap. So it meets all my goals for this project.

DSC_9186

Here is the bodice worn, this is a few steps further along after it had been sewed to the skirt and I added a sash.

It fits really nicely and I like how the neckline turned out!

Photo on 10-1-14 at 12.54 PM

Next week i’ll talk about making the skirt and assembling it all together. I also have some historical projects coming up this month, if you are getting sick of fashiony stuff just wait around a bit longer!

Thanks for reading!

 
9 Comments

Posted by on October 3, 2014 in Original Designs, The Making Of

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Making a Fall Flower Fairy, Part Three

DSC_9101RESIZEThis is the final post in my Fall Flower Fairy series, but I should be getting photographs of this project soon, so this isn’t the last you’ll see of it! The first two posts can be found here and here.

This post will cover the process of making the headpiece and wand, but I skimped a little bit on the photographs. If you are interested in seeing the start to finish process I have a video that shows me making the accessories, and it can be watched here!

If you recall my post about making the skirt, I made the tulle layer to long and had to cut off quite a bit.

DSC_8872 I saved this bit and ended up using it as the base for this crown. I also used some Christmas ribbon and a bit of plastic boning.

As per usual I measured my head, then cut the boning a little longer than the measurement. The ribbon, which will be used to cover the boning was cut to be an inch longer.

DSC_9005

I started by stitching the tulle onto the ribbon, then I trimmed the edges to make everything even.

DSC_9007

 I folded the ribbon upward and sewed it into a channel, then threaded the boning through. When that was done I stitched the ends together and bam, I had a crown!

DSC_9009

 …Then I hot glued a bunch of crap onto it. That is literally the entire process. I used lot’s of fake berries, feathers, grain, and even fake pumpkins to make this look a bit more unique and less generic. I think I was successful, it certainly doesn’t look like any flower crown i’ve seen before.

DSC_9013

 Some nicer photos of the finished piece.

DSC_9022

DSC_9021

Since i’ve used the word fairy in the title of this project I wanted to make a wand. Okay, so that’s kind of an excuse, the main reason I wanted to make a wand is because i’m terribly awkward in photos, especially when it comes to my hands. A prop is a good distraction from this.

I decided to use a walking stick as a base. My Grandpa carved this one for me when I was very young and i’ve grown so much that it’s nowhere near tall enough to be functional. It has some sentimental value, but has been collecting dust in the basement for eight years, so I was happy to find a use for it.

DSC_9011

It has my name carved into it and everything!

DSC_9012

 I used an empty ribbon spool as a base for flowers.

DSC_9014

…Then glued flowers onto it. I don’t know why I didn’t take any photos of this process, but clearly, I didn’t.

It was pretty straightforward, a lot of fiddling around and holding things in place for many minutes since hot glue is a lot less function when it comes to non porous materials!! Flowers kept falling off since I didn’t hold them for long enough, it  was quite the mess. But i’m happy with the end result, I think it’s cute, and certainly fit for a fairy!

DSC_9026

DSC_9025

 Here are some worn photos of the whole thing together.

DSC_9067RESIZE

DSC_9052RESIZE

DSC_9122RESIZE

DSC_9101RESIZE Thanks for reading!

 
6 Comments

Posted by on September 26, 2014 in Original Designs, The Making Of

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Making a Fall Flower Fairy, Part Two

Making a Fall Flower Fairy, Part Two

This is part two in my Fall Flower Fairy project, part one covers how I made the skirt and can be read here.

Today i’ll be going over how I made the bodice. If you’re interested, i’ve created a video that shows (some) of the process, and that can be watched here!

This bodice was originally supposed to look like two oak leaves…but then I wanted to add sleeves, so I changed the shape…but when I made the sleeves I didn’t like how they looked. This bodice didn’t turn out how I had expected, not even close, but I really love the end result.

Step one was draping the pattern. I’ve been asked about the process a lot recently and I will be doing a draping tutorial soon, I just haven’t gotten to it yet.

DSC_8851

I didn’t really know where this was going when I started, I didn’t even have a sketch so it was an adventure!

DSC_8852

I had planned on it being a five piece pattern but I managed to draft it as one, so that was neat.

DSC_8853

As lovely as the care bear print was, I decided to turn it into a proper paper pattern. Then I cut the pattern from chiffon and organza to create the base for my bodice.

DSC_8855 The layers were pinned together, then basted together with large stitches.

DSC_8857

The next step was adding the boning channels. I used a colored pencil to mark the placement.

DSC_8858

 To create the channels I cut one inch strips of cotton sateen, folded the edges over, then pinned and stitched them in place.

DSC_8859

 Before adding the boning I used a colored pencil to mark an inch away from the neckline. Later on I’ll fold the edge over until it touches this line, which will create a half inch seam allowance.

DSC_8860

 I added the boning, then pinned the edge. Pinning curves inward is never fun, so many pinpricks!

DSC_8862

 I used tiny stitches to secure the edge in place.

DSC_8863 Then the fun part, flower arranging! I didn’t have very many small flowers left so this was a bit tricky, but I managed to place them in a way that I really like!

DSC_8864 I trimmed all the flower backs down so they would lay flat against the fabric. Then I used hot glue to secure them in place.

DSC_8866

DSC_8868

After all the flowers were on I used a lint roller to remove any glue trails and lint. Then two layers of tulle were draped and pinned overtop.

DSC_8873 The tulle was sewn down with more tiny stitches and the end result looked like this!

DSC_8881

 It’s quite lovely but not done yet! The interior edges were fraying so I pinned lace over top of them.

DSC_8891

Then the lace was sewn down.

DSC_8895

And the bodice was pretty much done!

DSC_8893

DSC_8894

 As far as dress assembly goes, it was pretty simple. I machine stitched the waist seam, then used home made bias tape to cover any raw edges.

DSC_8988

The back seam was done up almost all the way. I left room for a zipper but there was to much material to stitch through AND I made it slightly too small. I ended up using embroidered eyelets as closures for the dress which worked really well.

DSC_8989

Here is the finished back – It does lace closed all the way but I am the absolute worse at getting myself into dresses.

DSC_9081

So that’s that! I really adore how this dress turned out. It’s the type of dress that makes you smile, it’s so fluffy and flowery I just love it. I’ll have more photos in my next post, which will cover making the headpiece and “wand”!

DSC_9101RESIZE

 Thanks for reading!

 
9 Comments

Posted by on September 25, 2014 in Original Designs, The Making Of

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,412 other followers