RSS

Making a 16th Century Dress, Part Three

15 Jun

So I skipped almost two weeks of posting. In my defense, I was traveling for a week of that and fully planned on updating while in hotel rooms. I had several hours to kill most evenings, and nothing to do but blog! Unfortunately that plan didn’t work out since none of the hotels had reliable internet that allowed me to access wordpress, much less post anything. When I got home I had a rough time getting back into my routine, but i’m back!

I really wanted to make this post a progress report, since I have several projects in progress right now and plans for a few exciting ones. But I figured after two weeks a “The Making Of” would be more appreciated. So lets go through the process of adding a skirt to my tudor costume. If you are unfamiliar with this project, the previous posts can be read here.

I’m not sure where the photos of this laid out flat went, but I can’t find them. I think my folder with the first five photos or so got deleted, which is a shame. On the bright side,  the skirt pattern was really simple, two rectangles plus a rectangle with an arched bottom to create a train. If I had another two yards of material (which I planned on having) the train would be longer and the skirt would have two extra panels.

The panels were all sewn together with french seams. Then the lower edge was turned over by a half inch and basted down. Then it got turned over my an inch and a half and pinned down.

DSC_4314

Then that was stitched down with whip stitches.

DSC_4317

The side edges of the skirt also got turned over by an inch and a half. I stitched down both edges of the fabric with tiny running stitches.

DSC_4318

Since this fabric is pretty thin and cartridge pleating works best with thicker fabrics I decided to back the top few inches with flannel. I cut several strips of flannel and folded them in half.

DSC_4319

Then I sewed it on.

DSC_4326

The top edge was fraying like crazy, so I decided to cover it with bias tape. I had some of the damaged damask leftover and decided this would be a good use for it. I marked out all my two inch wide strips.

DSC_4324

Then cut them out and sewed them together.

DSC_4325

I ironed the raw edges inward and I had bias tape!

DSC_4327

One edge got sewn on.

DSC_4328

Then it was folded over the top edge and pinned down.

DSC_4329

And sewn down.

DSC_4330

Now it was time for pleating! I used chalk to mark two lines that are one and a half inches apart. Then I drew a line every four inches, which is how big the pleats will be. They are massive.

DSC_4389

I used upholstery thread to pleat everything so there was no chance of my thread breaking. Here is how it looked after being pleated.

DSC_4390

DSC_4391

DSC_4392

I was really happy with them until I pinned them onto my bodice. After I pinned them I realized cartridge pleats at this size collapse down and look a lot like normal box pleats. They do fold underneath and give a LOT more volume than regular pleats do, but i’m still a little disappointed!

DSC_4393

I sewed the skirt on with small whip stitches and upholstery thread…then went over my stitching again because I did a terrible job. I could fit my whole nail between the stitches!

DSC_4487

And that is it! The skirt was done and my dress finally had a lower half.

DSC_4451

Here is a teaser – in my super dusty mirror – of how it looks worn!

DSC_4464

I’ll be taking proper photos (maybe with a nice backdrop, if I can set something up) within the next week or two. But in the mean time, I did a video about this project which shows some close ups and the order everything is worn! That video can be watched below, or through this link.

This project is complete, but I still have a couple more blog posts to write about it, so you’ll be seeing lots more on the topic within the next little while.

Thank you for reading!

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

12 responses to “Making a 16th Century Dress, Part Three

  1. Neena Maddox

    June 15, 2015 at 6:25 pm

    I love your 16th century dress. I never thought of doing the sleeves that way. very beautiful. you inspire me. cant wait to see more.

     
  2. crochetbycalla

    June 15, 2015 at 8:48 pm

    Fantastic job on the video! The music became a little hectic by the end but I really enjoyed seeing all of the pieces come together.

     
  3. Space_wolf

    June 16, 2015 at 2:36 am

    Beautiful gown and a very inspurational project. Makes me wish I could risk a costume like that at my LARP events because it would suit my character so much.

     
  4. Amber Lee Peace

    June 16, 2015 at 12:00 pm

    Hello Angela! You can get some nice cartridge pleats on thinner fabric. Leimoi, The Dreamstress, shows some pretty ones on silk here: http://thedreamstress.com/2011/07/ninons-dress-the-skirt/. She’s also a great person to follow, as she teaches historical sewing professionally.

     
  5. Danielle

    June 16, 2015 at 4:22 pm

    Absolutely breathtaking! I love the experience of watching a Tudor lady get dressed. The whole ensemble reminds me of the painting of young Elizabeth. You would fit right in at Henry’s court !

     
  6. radgeekyrose

    June 17, 2015 at 10:23 pm

    Wow just amazing how beautiful it all turned out. You are so talented

     
  7. Lindsey

    June 18, 2015 at 10:38 pm

    hi!! Your dresses are so lovely🙂. I was wondering where you would recommend getting a damask fabric, I have checked at Joanns, onlinefabricstore.com, Hancock fabrics, and fabric.com. Any recommendations would be wonderful🙂 thanks!!

     
  8. Ari Baker

    June 19, 2015 at 7:05 am

    Oooh, it’s so beautiful!

     
  9. Karen K.

    June 19, 2015 at 8:13 am

    Amazing work as always! I am personally very thankful that clothing has changed so much! I have a hard time changing into clothes in the morning. I can’t imagine having to put on all those layers every day!

     
    • Angela Clayton

      June 19, 2015 at 6:51 pm

      Thank you – well usually you would have help! I think wearing them in the middle of summer would be the bigger problem. But I Agree, asm much as I love the historical stuff but I don’t think i’d be a very happy person without my elastic waistbands and knit shirts haha.

       
  10. Marie

    August 20, 2015 at 7:32 pm

    Thank you for including the video! I really loved seeing how each piece went on in order. What a process! I love and admire your work, as always.

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: