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Making Turn of the Century Foundation Garments

15 Jul
Making Turn of the Century Foundation Garments

So this post is probably going to be really long. And it’s also long overdue – most of these pieces were completed back in January!

These were made to pair with a few turn of the century gowns that I had planned (including this taffeta dress), and were some of the first things I made in 2016. My goal was to have a full set of foundation garments that would work for the 1890s and the early 1900s. That was supposed to include a corset, chemise, bloomers, and a petticoat.

That didn’t really end up happening. My corset has the wrong silhouette, i’m not very happy with the chemise, and I never ended up making the bloomers. But I invested a lot of time into these pieces and I ended up wearing them with a few projects, so I thought I should write about them anyway!

All these pieces were made primarily from a white eyelet cotton fabric I purchased in the garment district. They are trimmed with white lace from my stash, a pink embroidered lace I got on etsy, and pink ribbon in various widths.

We’ll start with the corset. Usually I use corset patterns from Norah Waugh’s Corsets and Crinolines* – which is what I should have done here. But I was feeling a bit lazy, and I had recently come across a corset I made for a class a few years back. The corset didn’t fit me very well (too large in the stomach, and too tight across my ribs) and wasn’t a style I could pair with historical costumes.

So I decided to take it apart, make a few alterations, and reuse the boning to create a more historically accurate silhouette. And I wouldn’t have to cut or tip any boning as long as I kept all the boning channels on my altered pattern the same length!

1890s cycling-0248

I also added seam allowance for a busk at the front, and changed the neckline. Then I cut the pieces out from denim and marked the boning channels.

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 I cut out the top layers of fabric, which consist of muslin and eyelet cotton.

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And sewed all the boning channels.

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Then the pieces were sewn together…

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And I had something that looked like this!

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Before sewing the front panels to the rest of the corset I added the busk, well first I prepared the fabric for the busk. See all the gaps in the seam? That’s where the hooks will poke out.

1890s corset-0553

And here it is sewn in place. Someone on instagram said I sewed it in upside down, but it was a little late to change it by that point and it doesn’t really effect the wear of the corset so i’m not too bothered.

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Preparing the other side. I made the holes, then fray checked them and waited for that to dry before inserting the busk.

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I trimmed the denim seam allowances down to a quarter inch, then added the boning.

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The top and bottom edges were both finished with two inch wide facings that were sewn on with half inch seam allowances.

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At this point it was starting to look like a corset!

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Next step were the eyelets – I chose to hand embroider them, as per usual, since I prefer them to metal.

1890s corset-0576

I used pink thread for this but they look like a weird off white color in photos, which sort of sucks!

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At this point I could do my first real first real fitting. It was slightly too large in the bust, so I added a dart to either side, but other than that it was fine.

1890s corset-0660

Which meant I could start decorating it! I decided to use some chantilly lace across the top edge – this is a cheap one I got off etsy.

1890s corset-0691

I cut it into two forty inch lengths, then folded the ends inward and sewed them down by hand so they wouldn’t fray.

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I turned the top edge inward by a third of an inch, then sewed it down to create a channel for ribbon.

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I threaded some pink ribbon through it and used that to gather the ribbon down. The end result looks quite delicate and pretty – or at least it does in my opinion!

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I sewed that on by hand.

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Then the corset was lined with muslin.

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And that’s it! I left the ends of the ribbon long so they can tie into a bow at the center front. I think it’s the prettiest foundation garment i’ve made – it’s so frilly, I love it. And i’m actually pretty fond of how it looks worn. It just isn’t right for this period.

1890s corset-0916

It doesn’t give nearly the amount of reduction it should and it looks quite bulky when dresses are worn overtop of it. I think it will work nicely with dresses from the late edwardian period, when more natural waists were becoming acceptable, but it definitely doesn’t suit the variety of eras i’d hoped it would. I’m going to attempt making something more suitable soon, this time following an actual historical pattern!

1890s corset-2

Also, i’m aware tying corsets is the front is bad for them, but I can’t tie them tight enough without help and since I usually only have them on for short periods of time i’m not too bothered!

1890s corset-10

Now for the chemise. I made this before doing any real research on the 1890’s, from fabrics I had around, and based it almost entirely off this image. Looking back I wish I had made a fuller chemise, with some lace inset work, but my hope was that this slimmer design could be worn with fitted dresses from later periods, making it more versatile.

Instead of doing lace inset, I made a lace collar that the fabric falls from. I made a pattern for this, then pleated lengths of lace so it fit inside the pattern.

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The pleats were sewn in place, then I trimmed the ends so they line up nicely.

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I sewed ribbon down the center of the lace, then sewed the lace together at the front.

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The body of the chemise is one piece, with a seam at the back.

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The arm openings were finished with bias tape.

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Then the top edge was folded outward, and the lace collar was pinned on.

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I sewed it on by machine.

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Then covered the stitching with a ribbon lace from Jo-anns, which was sewn on by hand.

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The hem is a simple double hem.

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Which I covered with ruffled embroidered lace.

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Then I sewed  on the lace I had leftover from making the collar, this covers the top edge of the ruffled lace.

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And it’s finished off with ribbon and ribbon lace.

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The back seam is done up with a french seam and that’s it!

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I think this looks quite pretty when worn with the corset – but In the future I would like to make a more traditional turn of the century chemise using some historical methods.

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And the final piece i’ll be talking about today is the combination set. This combines the chemise and bloomers into one garment. I hadn’t originally planned on making this, but my chemise was too long to be worn with my cycling costume, and I wanted something to fill out the cycling bloomers that wasn’t too bulky.

I draped the bodice on my dress from, then cut it out from more eyelet cotton. The neckline was gathered down, then straps were sewn on and the seam allowances were covered with lace tape.

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The collar is covered with an embroidered lace applique that a reader sent me a couple years ago, and the rest of the visible edges are covered with ribbon.

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The back closes with six hand sewn eyelets, and I attached little bows to the straps because I really like bows.

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Here is the finished bodice.

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The bottom portion is a slimmer, shorter version of the bloomers pattern I drafted a while back. This was sewn together with french seams.

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I left the bottom few inches open so I could get my legs into them.

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Then I sewed mesh lace onto the cuffs with a one inch seam allowance.

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Then the seam allowance was sewn down to create a channel for ribbon.

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Ribbon got threaded through that to create adorable ruffly little cuffs.

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I sewed the shorts to the bodice, then covered the raw edge with lace tape – this creates another channel, which will also be used for ribbon.

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I sewed up the back, leaving the top few inches open. There is also a half inch opening at the waistline, which is where the ribbon will be threaded through.

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Here is how it looked when I was done! This was a lot of fun to make. Since I cheated and did most of it by machine it came together in less than a day.

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It’s also really practical, i’ve been wearing it with a bunch of projects since it’s so comfy and the straps can easily be tucked down for off-the-shoulder dresses (like my civil war era ball gown). I see myself getting a lot of use out of it!

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And that’s it for this post! Three projects, fifteen hundred words, fifty-ish photos, and lots of frills.

If you want to read even more about frilly foundation garments, the blog post about making a matching petticoat is here.

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Thanks for reading!

 

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4 responses to “Making Turn of the Century Foundation Garments

  1. Ellie

    July 16, 2016 at 7:25 am

    These foundation garments are very beautiful and lacy! I love the pink accents you’ve used, it looks really cute and girly with the white. I just love the combination set, too!

     
  2. Talia Stevens

    July 22, 2016 at 8:56 am

    Hi, i just found your blog recently and I’m really enjoying seeing your creations. I wanted to note that it’s not “cheating” to sew something for the 1890’s by machine, the sewing machine was a common household item by then. Besides, I do War of 1812 reenacting and I have no problem using the machine for any seam that can’t be seen. It’s fun to sew a historic garment entirely by hand, but not always practical. Keep up the good work!

     
  3. Kory

    July 23, 2016 at 4:54 am

    Hi Angela! I’ve been following your blog regularly since a year ago or so and you really inspire me. It’s amazing you can manage to keep the work pace almost always that high!
    By the way, I have a question. I’m a cosplayer and I have to improve the undergarments of an Marie Antoinnete-ish dress from a videogame. My main concern is to conceal the hoops of the hoop skirt and achieve a poofy, smooth look for the dress. I’m planning to make a ruffled petticoat to wear it over the hoop skirt, but since the dress skirt is not that huge, I was wondering if just sewing some thick ruffles over the hoops, in the hoop skirt itself, would do the job. What do you think?
    Thank you and keep up the awesome work! 🙂

     
  4. Wildflowers & Paintbrushes

    August 22, 2016 at 7:34 pm

    Would you consider sharing your patterns so that others can remake your beautiful garments?

     

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